Tag Archives: Thyroid Hormones

Skin And Thyroid-Hormones Released Make You Healthier

When people think about getting healthier skin they do not often think of their thyroid gland. Most people do not realize the connection their thyroid has with their skin and as such will often neglect it. Your thyroid is in charge of a lot of things, most people know it for controlling your metabolism. What most people do not know is that your Skin and Thyroid are linked.

The hormones released by the thyroid gland does more than just regulate your metabolism, they also work to make your skin healthier. A lot of people suffering from hypothyroidism will notice that their skin suffers as well. They will feel dry and coarse and in colder temperatures they will seem itchy and may even notice cracks in their hands and fingers.

These problems are caused because your thyroid gland is not getting enough iodine. Iodine is a chemical that can be found in a variety of sources, such as the soil (and thus plants) and seawater (thus seafood). However in today’s society a lot of natural iodine is stripped from our food, which causes people to get less than they need and leads to hypothyroidism.

If you are concerned about your Skin and Thyroid then you should look into figuring out if hypothyroidism is the cause. There are many symptoms associated with hypothyroidism ranging from fatigue, constipation, weight gain, depression, and anxiety. Your skin looking worse is also a symptom.

If you notice that not only your skin is suffering but you also possess some of the other symptoms, than you may have found the cause. It is important you go and see your doctor to confirm whether or not hypothyroidism is to blame. A simple blood test is all it takes to determine that.

If hypothyroidism is the cause all you will have to worry about is making sure yo get enough iodine. Your doctor will likely prescribe some medication for you to take and may even advise you adjust your diet. That should be all it takes to get your thyroid in working order again.

Once you get your thyroid back under control you can expect to see stark improvement in the way your skin looks and feels. It should become smoother and more natural looking as it starts to receive the hormones it was sorely lacking.

While your thyroid may be to blame for your skin problems, it is not the only thing out there that can rob you of your beauty. There is a variety of other conditions and reasons for why your skin has the problems it does, and so if getting your thyroid back in top shape does not improve your skin, there may be other factors involved.

If that is the case you should look into other ways to get your skin looking it’s best and try to find the cause behind it. Your Skin and Thyroid are both important and critically linked, so even if your skin does not clear up at least you found out your thyroid was out of whack and fixed it.

Hormones And Thyroid-Active Or Under Active

Hormones and Thyroid are what control your metabolism and help keep your body running efficiency. If your thyroid is not operating as it should, this can lead to a host of problems. The two main issues with your thyroid are hyperthyroidism, where it is over active, and hypothyroidism, where it is under active.

While hyperthyroidism is not as common as hypothyroidism, both conditions stem from iodine. Iodine is a crucial element in thyroid function as it acts as a fuel for your thyroid gland. Hyperthyroidism is generally caused when you take in too much iodine and hypothyroidism is generally caused by not getting enough iodine.

A slew of symptoms can occur from both over active and under active thyroid glands. From gaining weight and being unable to shed it to losing too much weight and putting your health at risk. There are also mental symptoms such as depression and anxiety that can be caused by these conditions.

These problems are why it is important to maintain a balanced intake of iodine so that your thyroid can function normally. The problem with this is that most people do not even know whether or not their thyroid is acting up.

All the symptoms caused by your Hormones and Throid gland acting up can also be caused by a variety of other things, which makes it incredibly difficult to determine whether or not your thyroid is to blame. It is actually because of this that most cases of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism go untreated for a long time.

If you think that your thyroid is to blame then it is advised you go to your doctor and ask them to check it out for you. A simple blood test is all it takes to determine whether or not your thyroid is the cause.

While these conditions are pretty mild and easily treated, they are not something you should ignore if you can help it. They can lead to more serious problems down the road if left untreated and there is always the chance that it is something more serious that is causing your thyroid to go out of whack such as cancer.

If it turns out that your thyroid is the cause and you are suffering from hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, do not be all that concerned. As I already said, these are fairly mild conditions and are easily treated. In most cases simply adjusting your intake of iodine can do the trick.

While this is a lifelong problem you will have to live with, it will not have all that much impact on your daily life. Simply taking medication and maybe adjusting your diet is all that is required to get your Hormones and Throid back in working order.

If, in the unlikely event that your thyroid problems stem from something else you might have to take more drastic measures. As always you should talk to your doctor and get all the facts from them. They will tell you what you should do in order to deal with any condition you may be suffering.

Illnesses That Can Cause a Sleep Disorder

Many times a sleep disorder can be caused from an illness or from the medications used to treat an illness. Some of the common health conditions that can cause a sleeping problem are cardiovascular disease, endocrine disorders, neurological disorders, respiratory disease, mental illness, gastroesophageal reflux disease, kidney disease, and arthritis.

Cardiovascular disease includes congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease. These are the two most common heart problems that affect sleep and can cause a sleep disorder. Congestive heart failure occurs when the heart can no longer pump enough blood fo the body’s needs. Blood backs up in the veins of the heart which lead to the kidneys and edema eventually damages the lungs and other organs. People suffering from congestive heart failure have a very high risk of developing the sleep disorder of obstructive sleep apnea. Coronary heart disease is the build up of fatty deposits in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, called atherosclerosis. This condition also can lead to obstructive sleep apnea.

Sleep disorders can occur from endocrine disorders such as diabetes and thyroid disease. Diabetes is a disease that affects the way the body processes and uses carbohydrates, fats and proteins. People that have uncontrolled diabetes often develop the sleep disorder of restless leg syndrome. Thyroid hormones regulate the body’s energy levels. Hyperthyroidism can make it difficult to fall asleep, and cause night sweats the person to wake.

Neurological disorders include Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, and strokes. Parkinson’s disease is a central nervous system disorder. This disease causes problems with body motion, including tremors, unstable posture, slowed body movements, muscle stiffness, and difficulty walking. Sleep disorders that occur with this disease include REM sleep behavior disorder and sleep onset insomnia. Alzheimer’s disease impairs the brain’s intellectual functions and is the most common cause of dementia. This disease causes sleep fragmentation. Epilepsy causes recurrent, sudden, brief changes in the normal electrical activity of the brain. People with this condition are twice as likely to suffer from the sleep disorder insomnia. People that suffer a stroke usually also have obstructive sleep apnea.

People that have respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,
usually also have a sleep disorder. Asthma is a chronic lung condition that makes breathing difficult when air passages become inflamed and narrow. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, known as COPD, refers to a group of disorders that damage the lungs and make breathing difficult. Many people with these conditions suffer from insomnia and sleep fragmentation.

Mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder can also lead to a sleep disorder. People with these mental health disorders often suffer from sleep fragmentation and insomnia.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, known as GERD, causes the stomach’s juices to flow backwards into the esophagus. This causes the sleep disorder of sleep fragmentation.

Kidney disease causes the kidneys to lose their ability to filter the proper amount of waste products from the blood and regulate the body’s balance of salt and water. This can cause the sleep disorders of restless leg syndrome and insomnia to develop.

People with arthritis often find it difficult to fall asleep because of the pain. This often results in insomnia.

If an illness causes a sleep disorder to develop, the sleep disorder is secondary to the illness. Successful treatment of the primary underlying cause will usually diminish the effects of the sleep disorder.

Panic Attacks — Signs of Vulnerability

Panic attacks do not come from nowhere, though the possibility of them coming out of the blue cannot be discounted. Nonetheless, there is always that something that triggers the occurrence of such attacks. Experts believe that the causes are multi-factorial and pre-disposing factors are many. Included are the following:

Genetics. Panic attacks run in the family. If you great grandfather had it, there is a relative possibility that you might develop the disorder as well. In typical cases, those people who have relatives with panic attacks are twice more likely to experience either acute or chronic but intermittent episodes of panic disorder than normal people. Nonetheless, there are people who have family history of panic attacks that do not develop the disorder.

Medical causes. There are several medical conditions that could allow for the development of panic disorder and panic attacks. Among them are mitral valve prolapse, hypoglycemia, hyperthyroidism, abrupt withdrawal from medication usage, and use of stimulants. Mitral valve prolapse, otherwise known as MVP, is a heart disease that affects the mitral valves, the part of the heart that prevents the backflow of blood. The symptoms of this disease are shortness of breath and chest pain along with others. Not only do these symptoms resemble those of panic attacks but research by the American Heart Association confirmed that there is a direct link between MVP and panic attacks.

Hypoglycemia, on the other hand, is a condition characterized by a lower level of blood glucose. Meanwhile, hyperthyroidism is also a condition that is somehow linked with panic attacks. This condition is marked by the overproduction of thyroid hormones namely T3 and T4 hormones. Abrupt withdrawal from certain medications is also believed to be a cause of panic attacks since this triggers sudden changes in the body. Another factor that may lead to the development of panic attacks is the use of stimulant substances such as beverages with high caffeine content and marijuana.

Medications. The body’s reaction to foreign materials with medical properties is not always necessarily positive. There are cases when the substances found in the drugs produce the right conditions in the body conducive to the arousal of panic attacks. For example, methylphenidate which is more commonly known as Ritalin is used for patients of ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as well as narcolepsy could cause panic attacks for some people.

Gender. This seems to be a predisposing factor towards the development of panic disorder. According to studies females are 50% more likely than their counterparts to develop the disorder.

Major life events. Substantial events in life that lead to extreme changes can create the right environments for the occurrence of panic attacks. This may be because such drastic changes create tensions in the homeostasis of a person’s life, thus upsetting the previous order of things and forcing the person to confront the changes. If the person fails to respond accordingly, the tension may persist and he might be overcome by it. Thus, producing a number of symptoms that could be characterized under psychological disorders, panic attacks included.

Phobias. Although the statistics are not established yet, it seems clear that people who have severe cases of phobias are more susceptible to developing panic disorders. This could be due to the fact that phobias cause elevated levels of fear to start with.