Tag Archives: Saliva

The Risk of Communicable Disease for a Dental Assistant

Dental Assistants need to make sure they fully understand the risk of communicable diseases. A communicable disease is one that is transmitted by saliva, blood, and other bodily fluids. Dental Assistants are at a very high risk because their hands come into contact with patients mouths all day long. This exposes them to saliva and often blood. While patients are asked to disclose information about communicable diseases including HIV, many choose not to. Some communicable diseases such as herpes form sores in the mouth and Dental Assistants need to be able to identify them. A Dental Assistant should assume every patient is contagious and take all precautions against infection.

Dental Assistants should always were gloves while working with patients. Even if they are only observing the procedure. This is because you never know what a normal procedure will turn into a crisis. The Dental Assistant will have to be able to jump in and assist at a moments notice. There is no time to stop to put on gloves, and it is not accepted in the dental field to perform any type of procedure without them.

If you feel that you have poked a hole in a glove, immediately throw it away and replace it. Do not take any chances. Communicable diseases can make you ill as the least or result in death at the other extreme. Since open sores are the most common way for communicable diseases to enter your body, make sure any such sore is completely covered with a bandage, band aid, or other covering that wont come off with your gloves. Keep the sores covered until they have healed completely.

Another valuable way to prevent communicable diseases is to follow all safety procedures as outlined by the employer. If you are unclear, ask. Never take shortcuts, especially in the areas of sterilizing tools and the proper use of tools. This can lead to serious repercussions if other patients become infected with communicable diseases from dirty tools.

If you find that you have come into direct contact with saliva, blood, or other bodily fluids that could potentially lead to a communicable disease, wash the area immediately with soap and water. Many communicable diseases including the flu and the common cold cant survive soap and water. You will also need to report the incident to your direct supervisor.

All dental facilities have policies and procedures in place for dealing with contact of saliva, blood, or other bodily fluids. It is important that you completely understand these policies and procedures from the first day of employment. Make sure you follow them completely if you do experience such contact. Most dental facilities will have the procedures written and in an easily accessible location for quick reference.

Working as a Dental Assistant is a fun and rewarding career choice. You will have the opportunity to work with many people and to learn more about the dental field. You will be required to perform a variety of duties as well as sit in on several types of dental procedures. It is important to remember that your safety is very important. Make sure you are aware of the risk of communicable diseases and follow all procedures for prevention as well as reporting if such contact does take place during your employment as a Dental Assistant.

What Baby Acne is All About

Although teenagers are often the ones attacked by a bad case of acne, adults can have it too and surprisingly so do babies.

More common than you think

Baby acne is actually a common condition in newborns and it is a really normal occurrence. The condition is characterized by red bumps on the skin that may initially appear as rashes. Often, baby acne starts off about three to four weeks after birth and may last until he or she reaches about four to six months old. Still, there are some babies that develop baby acne at birth.

There is no clear cause of baby acne but some experts suggests the role of the hormones that mothers pass on to their child during the last stages of pregnancy. These hormones babies get from the womb and sometimes from the breastmilk play a role in the development of the acne condition. As your baby grows, these hormones slowly disappear from the system. When this happens, the problem acne also disappears.

And because baby acne is basically caused by the chemical make up of the body, there is really nothing you can do to prevent it from happening. The only thing perhaps that parents have a power on is to make sure that your baby will remain comfortable despite the problem and that it will not become worse because of irritation.

Although baby acne is actually not a cause for alarm as it is quite normal for some babies to develop them, it is still important that parents become aware of the condition so as not to exacerbate the case and increase the irritation. Symptoms of baby acne include red bumps that are commonly found on the cheeks. The bumps may also appear on the chin and on the forehead.

Aggravating matters

Baby acne frequently gets irritated when the baby becomes hit or fussy. The stress brought about by these conditions will often irritate the case. Saliva, spits and even milk may also exacerbate the problem, making it appear worse than before.

There is really no treatment available for baby acne. As mentioned before, the condition will disappear on its own once the hormones disappear from the system. Most doctors would recommend gentle washing of the face with a really mild cleanser to remove the oils. Vigorous washing is a no no as this can irritate the skin all the more. Remember that baby acne is not caused by germs or dirt but rather hormones so no amount of washing can make the condition go away. In addition, too much washing may also remove the natural oils of the skin, resulting in the increased activity of the oil glands. Like all other things, too much is also not good.

Another reminder for parents is to lessen or avoid altogether the use of oils and lotions on the skin as this can add up to the grease that are already acting up on the acne. Never ever put any skin ointments and other facial products as this can aggravate the matter. Using topical medicines on the problem areas may only make it worse especially if your babys skin is ultra sensitive. Before you do anything about it or apply anything, make sure that you have consulted your pediatrician or a dermatologist about it.