Tag Archives: Ligaments And Tendons

How Physiotherapy Fits in with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

Rheumatoid arthritis is not only a painful and debilitating disease. It is also a risk factor for other diseases such as heart disease and osteoporosis. Research shows that these diseases can be held off by exercise and other lifestyle changes.

For the sufferer of rheumatoid arthritis, life is a constant learning experience. Each time a new movement is done, one finds out if it makes the condition feel worse or better. Rheumatoid arthritis patients may feel fatigue. They will likely have a great amount of pain and stiffness in their joints.

Physiotherapy is one way to combat the effects of rheumatoid arthritis. This will be an ongoing therapy that will require dedication over the rest of the patient’s life. However, it is common that the exercises and other therapies help the rheumatoid arthritis so much that the patient will have incentive to keep doing them.

A physiotherapist understands how all the parts of one’s body work together to create movement. Bones, muscles, joints, ligaments, and tendons: the physiotherapist knows how they all fit to make one walk or stand. With this knowledge, the physiotherapist can devise methods to help one keep moving. This is the most important part of rheumatoid arthritis treatment.

Early in one’s treatment, the plan will take shape. It will include ways to prevent rheumatoid arthritis from disabling one. As time goes by, the focus will shift to a more here and now sort of treatment. Exercises will be geared more towards current problems.

Water exercises can be used for people with rheumatoid arthritis. These exercises allow the person to get much needed strengthening and stretching exercises done. At the same time, there is little or no pressure on the joints or spine. Physiotherapists use water exercises as an important part of the treatment plan.

Strengthening exercises help the muscles provide more support to the joints of people with rheumatoid arthritis. If there is not enough muscle tone, the patient will have more trouble walking or doing other normal movements. The rheumatoid arthritis will dominate the movements instead of the muscles dominating them.

Heat therapy can be used in conjunction with ice therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. A physiotherapist can tell the patient when and how long to leave on heat packs or ice packs. Other heat therapy is done by ultrasound.

People with rheumatoid arthritis can benefit from manual procedures, such as massage. A person with the stiffness that accompanies rheumatoid arthritis can be very limited in how far he can move his joints. Massage improves movement and increases this range dramatically.

One of the most important functions a physiotherapist serves for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is as a motivational coach. The physiotherapist should be trained in the psychology of chronic disorders and pain management. She will be there to encourage you to keep trying, keeping moving, and never giving up.

Physiotherapy is only a part of the treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Diet and medications are also used, for example. Yet, without physiotherapy, many people who suffer from this disease would be in much worse pain.

What May Cause Back Neck Pain

Though cases of cervical neck pain is more infrequent as compared to lumbar pain, a large portion of the American population still undergoes neck pains that often come with arm pain. The majority of such cases may be healed in time without the need of medical interventions. But there are a number of symptoms that may prove to be indications of more serious cases and need immediate medical help.

One such symptom is the progressive neurological degeneration, which may manifest as weakening of the arms or loss of sensitivity and coordination of the limbs. Another sign is the sustained pain that is accompanied with unplanned weight loss, fever, shakes and chills, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting that are signs of spinal infection or tumor.

While the majority of back neck pain does not have identifiable anatomical roots, many are closely linked to general conditions such as muscle strain and herniated vertebral disc.

Acute Back Neck Pain
The most common causes of acute neck pain are muscle strain, neck strain and strain experienced by other softer tissues such as ligaments and tendons. Neck strain is due to stiff neck caused by wrong bed position and partly due to carrying too many loads. A sudden jolt and pressure on the other hand may cause muscle strain.

Majority of minor injuries on the soft tissues usually heals a couple of days after the pain. There is good blood supply in this section of the body, which allow the circulation of protein and essential nutrients that trigger fast healing. To alleviate the pain and symptoms of back neck pain, the sufferer may use conservative methods such as physical therapy, ice or heat, osteopathic manipulation and medications.

Chronic Back Neck Pain
This form of neck pain is very much the same in effects with acute back neck pain. However, they largely differ on the symptoms. Listed below are some of the symptoms of chronic back pain:

Neck back pain that goes down to the arms
Neck pain that may be linked to certain activities
Arm pain due to lack of coordination
Neck back pain that may be felt for much longer duration of time
Neck pain that may go worse by the end of the day and in the morning

Other than these, there are a number of common symptoms that may be associated with cervical conditions. These may bring other cervical problems like wrist pain, shoulder pain, headaches and elbow pain.