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Do Animals Get Warts?

Not only are various animals capable of getting warts, the often do. In some types of animals, warts can be deadly. One of the main examples of how warts can affect a non-human species is that of the turtle. In recent years, studies have been conducted to research the causes and effects of warts on certain types of turtles.

The findings are startling. A virus called fibropapillomatosis is the contributing factor. Unlike the warts found in humans, which are generally located in the epidermis, the warts which affect these turtles spread throughout their bodies. The warts are then capable of obstructing the turtle’s internal organs. This then can cause the turtle to die, either from starvation from being unable to see or swim properly, or from other bacterial infections. There has been a steady decrease in the population of sea turtles; the warts which affect their bodies is the primary reason for this.

In dogs, the virus which causes warts is the canine viral papillomas. Unless a dog’s warts become infected, the general rule is to leave the warts undisturbed, as they usually disappear with time. A dog’s warts are rarely a problem unless they are located about the mouth or other area which is sensitive and prone to bacteria and moisture. In some instances, a dog will require antibiotics. In dogs, warts usually appear in clusters, rather than as individual warts.

Dogs acquire warts in the manner similar to how humans get warts they contract them from other dogs who already have them. Canine warts can only be be spread amongst dogs. They pose no risk to other types of animals, nor can people contract warts from their dogs.

Warts are less common in cats, but they do sometimes occur. Older cats are the most prone to contracting warts. Removal is not generally indicated unless the wart becomes infected. There is more danger in the wart becoming infected through the cat’s scratching or other activity than by the wart’s state itself. These warts also are not transmittable to humans.

Cows can contract warts. In cattle, the term for warts is infectious papillomatosis, which refers to the papillomatomavirus which causes them. In cows, warts are not usually serious and eventually disappear, but they are highly contagious. When cows have warts, isolating them from other cattle is important. It has not yet been determined whether either this virus being present in a cow or the antibiotics given to clear it up have an effect on the safety of its milk.

Warts are the easiest way of determining whether a specific amphibian is a frog or a toad. Although there is quite a large variety of these creatures, by first appearance they have much in common. This amphibian has legs, but no tail; but the way to know for certain which type it is is whether or not it has warts. All types of toads have warts; no type of frog has them. Contrary to folk stories, the “warts” which are on toads are not related to the virus which causes warts in humans.

Foot Complications of Diabetes

Whenever we think about people with diabetes, we often think of them as having problems with their feet. This is one of the most common complications of diabetes and diabetes, more than anyone, need to make certain that they address any problems with their feet early on as such problems can result in a life threatening condition.

Foot complications of diabetes are caused by neuropathy. Because the high glucose levels in the blood of a diabetic person affects the central nervous system after a period of time, it also affects nerves in various parts of your body. Most often effected are the nerves in the feet. The furthest from the brain, it is here where people with diabetes who have nerve damage, often do not feel cold or pain or even heat. People with diabetes that is uncontrolled often can injure their feet without feeling it. The injury may result in a blister or wound that will be slow to heal. The blister or wound becomes infected and the foot complications of diabetes begin.

In addition to not having the proper nerve sensations in their feet, people with diabetes often develop very dry feet because the nerves that secrete oil into the feet no longer work. Their feet may peel and crack, which only makes it even more probable for them to get sores and wounds in their feet.

Because high blood glucose levels make it difficult to stave off infection, a diabetic with a sore on their foot must be treated differently than a person without diabetes. The sore may be very slow to heal, if it heals at all. Infection often sets in. This can lead to gangrene and, in some cases, amputation.

Foot complications of diabetes work like this. A person who has diabetes and who has not been keeping their blood glucose level under control gets an injury on their toe. It begins to bleed and crack. Then bandage it, hoping it will heal. It does not heal and soon the wound becomes infected. They go to the doctor who begins to treat the wound with antibiotics. Sometimes this works, sometimes it does not.

When the wound does not heal and the infection begins to spread, gangrene can set in. Gangrene can kill a person, and the doctor knows this. So the person with diabetes has a choice, they can either lose their toe or their life. In most cases, they choose to lose the toe.

In some cases, however, the gangrene has already spread to the foot. Plus, the amputation risks more infection. In many cases, not only does the person lose their toe, but their entire foot. And this can continue until they lose their leg.

This information is not meant to frighten anyone with diabetes. It is only to make a person realize how vital it is for anyone with this condition to be aware of the feet complications of diabetes. No one has to lose a toe or a foot or a leg. They simply need to manage their disease so that they can retain a healthy blood glucose level that will enable them to fight off any infection that may arise from a bump on the foot and stave off neuropathy. By maintaining a healthy glucose level and avoiding glycemia, a person with diabetes can lead a full life. The trick is to follow the rules dictated by the condition.

Avoid foods that are high in starch and sugars. The Glycemic Index is an excellent tool that can inform a diabetic about which foods should be avoided. Maintain your weight and exercise regularly. This will also boost your immune system. Be sure to visit your doctor regularly and monitor your blood glucose level. Keep a record of the levels to present to your doctor so he or she can adjust your insulin or medication if needed. By complying with your physician, you an avoid many of the complications that accompany diabetes.

Diabetes does not have to be a killer. Glycemia is life threatening but can be controlled. If you or a loved one has this condition, see the doctor regularly and follow the plans to manage the disease.

Accutane Helps Your Skin Renew Itself More Quickly

Accutane is a form of vitamin A. It reduces the amount of oil released by oil glands in your skin, and helps your skin renew itself more quickly.

Accutane is used to treat severe nodular acne. It is usually given after other acne medicines or antibiotics have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

What is the most important information I should know about Accutane?

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby’s ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

Women of child-bearing potential must agree in writing to use two specific forms of birth control and have regular pregnancy tests before, during, and after taking Accutane. Unless you have had a total hysterectomy or have been in menopause for at least a year, you are considered to be of child-bearing potential.

Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. You must be registered in the program and sign agreements to use birth control and undergo pregnancy testing as required by the program. Read all program brochures and agreements carefully.

It is dangerous to try and purchase Accutane on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States. The sale and distribution of Accutane outside of the iPLEDGE program violates the regulations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the safe use of this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Accutane?
Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the dangers of this medication and that you agree to use birth control as required by the program. Read all of the iPLEDGE program brochures and agreements carefully. Ask your doctor or call the drug maker if you have questions about the program or the written requirements.

Before taking Accutane, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, or if you have:

– a personal or family history of depression or mental illness
– heart diease, high cholesterol or triglycerides
– osteoporosis or other bone disorders
– diabetes
– asthma
– an eating disroder
– or liver disease

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take Accutane.

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby’s ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

For Women: Unless you have had your uterus and ovaries removed (total hysterectomy) or have been in menopause for at least 12 months in a row, you are considered to be of child-bearing potential.

Even women who have had their tubes tied are required to use birth control while taking Accutane.

It is not known whether Accutane passes into breast milk. Do not take Accutane without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Accutane Helps Your Skin Renew Itself More Quickly

Accutane is a form of vitamin A. It reduces the amount of oil released by oil glands in your skin, and helps your skin renew itself more quickly.

Accutane is used to treat severe nodular acne. It is usually given after other acne medicines or antibiotics have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

What is the most important information I should know about Accutane?

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby’s ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

Women of child-bearing potential must agree in writing to use two specific forms of birth control and have regular pregnancy tests before, during, and after taking Accutane. Unless you have had a total hysterectomy or have been in menopause for at least a year, you are considered to be of child-bearing potential.

Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. You must be registered in the program and sign agreements to use birth control and undergo pregnancy testing as required by the program. Read all program brochures and agreements carefully.

It is dangerous to try and purchase Accutane on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States. The sale and distribution of Accutane outside of the iPLEDGE program violates the regulations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the safe use of this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Accutane?
Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the dangers of this medication and that you agree to use birth control as required by the program. Read all of the iPLEDGE program brochures and agreements carefully. Ask your doctor or call the drug maker if you have questions about the program or the written requirements.

Before taking Accutane, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any foods or drugs, or if you have:

– a personal or family history of depression or mental illness
– heart diease, high cholesterol or triglycerides
– osteoporosis or other bone disorders
– diabetes
– asthma
– an eating disroder
– or liver disease

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take Accutane.

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby’s ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

For Women: Unless you have had your uterus and ovaries removed (total hysterectomy) or have been in menopause for at least 12 months in a row, you are considered to be of child-bearing potential.

Even women who have had their tubes tied are required to use birth control while taking Accutane.

It is not known whether Accutane passes into breast milk. Do not take Accutane without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.